HOME

SAN DIEGO BEACHES

SAN DIEGO ATTRACTIONS

SAN DIEGO EVENTS

SAN DIEGO AREA DAY TRIPS

SAN DIEGO BUSINESS AND SHOPPING

SAN DIEGO RESTAURANTS

SAN DIEGO HOTELS

QUICK FIND: SAN DIEGO TOURS



San Diego Attractions

Desert Garden Balboa Park



View: Balboa Park's Spanish Desert Garden.
This tour requires Quicktime. If you can't see the virtual image,
Click here for free Quicktime download.


>>>Back to Balboa Park

The Desert Garden came about through as much human perseverance as plant persistence to thrive in extreme, arid, inhospitable areas.

Succulent gardens had been in at least four different places in Balboa Park since 1916. Donations filled the separate cactus and aloe-agave gardens that Kate Sessions helped establish for the 1935 Exposition, after which the gardens gradually fell into disrepair.

It wasn't until 1976 that the current 2.5-acre wedged parcel of land officially become Balboa Park's Desert Garden. Specimens were free because they came from the city nursery, but funding was necessary to move and replant them. Bulldozers moved 12,000 cubic yards of earth to regrade what was a flat plateau with a steep cliff into a gentle slope ending in a berm and a simulated dry stream bed. Pathways are gentle to accommodate wheelchairs.

The garden was designed in bands—trees, larger more rugged trees, a low natural fence of adobe brick, massive stone boulders interspersed throughout the garden, some placed to form benches, paths, a rocky dry pond and stream bed surrounded by palm trees where the cliff was, chaparral near the bottom toward the Florida Canyon.

Visitors who define cacti as tiny, thorny plants in nurseries or gift shops, and aloes as hard-to-find small plants, will be surprised at the variety and to realize that although a cactus is a succulent, succulents aren't only cacti. The dramatic Dracaena draco is nearly 20 feet high.

The garden has more than 150 species of cacti and other desert plants from North and South America and about 1,300 sculpturesque cacti, aloes, and other succulent flora and drought-resistant plants from around the world. Specimens are planted as they would be found geologically, rather than geographically, therefore in unusual growth patterns.
Each season has something to offer. Amazing flowers bloom January through March.


Location: North of the footbridge that crosses Park Boulevard from the Natural History Museum. Easily accessible, but not readily seen from the road.

Park Avenue and Village Place, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101

Open 365 days a year, free.

Phone: (619) 233-9050

We are always adding new places and attractions, so check back often. If you have any Ideas for places you would like us to include, send your suggestions to info@aroundandaboutsandiego.com

 

 





ENews!
Receive updates via EMail

Receive updates via RSS




All VR movies require Quicktime,Click the QT logo if VR does not appear.


 
  site map | Monthly Best Sites | about us | contact us  
  2005 AroundandAboutSan Diego.com